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Sunday, July 19, 2020 | History

1 edition of Geological investigation of the Taurus-Littrow valley, Apollo 17 landing site found in the catalog.

Geological investigation of the Taurus-Littrow valley, Apollo 17 landing site

Geological investigation of the Taurus-Littrow valley, Apollo 17 landing site

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Published by U.S. Dept. of the Interior, Geological Survey in [Reston, Va.?] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Project Apollo (U.S.),
  • Lunar geology

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Edward W. Wolfe ... [et al.] with a section on Apollo 17 lunar surface photography by Raymond M. Batson, Kathleen B. Larson, and Richard L. Tyner
    SeriesGeological Survey professional paper -- 1080
    ContributionsWolfe, Edward W, United States. National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Geological Survey (U.S.)
    The Physical Object
    Paginationx, 280 p. :
    Number of Pages280
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15404802M
    LC Control Number80607848

    Things went really well for Apollo It was a mission that broke several off-world records, including the longest manned lunar landing flight, it was also the mission that had the longest total lunar surface EVA’s (Extravehicular Activities), and it was the mission that brought to Earth, the largest lunar sample, and was also the mission with the longest time in lunar orbit. Collections Lunar Module LM The lunar module represents one of humanity’s greatest achievements: landing people on another heavenly body.

      Additional images and info from the Lunar and Planetary Institute (Apo Apo Apo Apo Apo Apollo 17). Apollo 11's Traverse Map . The Geologic Investigation of the Taurus-Littrow Valley: Apollo 17 Landing Site by Edward W. Wolfe Geologic Map of the Apollo 16 Landing Site and Vicinity by U.S. Geological Survey Geologic Map of the Sabine D Region of the Moon by Department of the Interior.

    Apollo Quite the same Wikipedia. Just better. ICA () Relative Age of Camelot Crater and Crater Clusters Near the Apollo 17 Landing Site B. K. LUCCHITTA U. S. Geological Survey, Flagstaf, Arizona Received February 1, ; revised May 1, Topographic profiles and depth-diameter ratios from the crater Camelot and craters of the central cluster in the Apollo 17 landing area suggest that these craters are of the Cited by: 1.


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Geological investigation of the Taurus-Littrow valley, Apollo 17 landing site Download PDF EPUB FB2

Get this from a library. The Geologic investigation of the Taurus-Littrow valley, Apollo 17 landing site. [Edward W Wolfe; Geological Survey (U.S.),; United States. The Geologic Investigation of the Taurus-Littrow Valley: Apollo 17 Landing Site Geological Survey Professional Paper Edward W. Wolfe, Norman G.

Bailey, Baerbel K. Lucchitta, William R. Muehlberger, David H. Scott, Robert L. Sutton, and Howard G. Wilshire. Geologic Investigation of the Taurus-Littrow Apollo 17 landing site book Apollo 17 Landing Site Unknown Binding – January 1, See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions.

Price New from Used from Unknown Binding, "Please retry" — Manufacturer: National Aeronautics and Space Administration. GEOLOGIC INVESTIGATION OF THE TAURUS -LITTROW VALLEY: APOLLO 17 LANDING SITE from which samples were collected. Later, but still during the period of basin fo rmation, the ring structure and radial faults that define the massifs were imposed on the ejecta.

Apollo 17 (December 7–19, ) was the final Moon landing mission of NASA's Apollo program, and remains the most recent time humans have travelled beyond low Earth orbit. Its crew consisted of Commander Eugene Cernan, Lunar Module Pilot Harrison Schmitt, and Command Module Pilot Ronald Evans, and it carried a biological experiment containing five : Saturn V SA Apo crewed by Eugene Cernan, Ronald Evans, and Harrison Schmitt, was the final Apollo mission to the Moon.

The Lunar Module Challenger landed in the Taurus-Littrow valley on Decem and remained there for 75 hours. The landing site is a relatively flat spot among low mountains at the southeastern edge of Mare Serenitatis.

The images here are designed for display on. The landing site selected for Apollo 17 was in the Taurus-Littrow Valley on the eastern rim of Mare Serenitatis. The two primary objectives were obtaining samples of highland material that were older than the Imbrium impact and investigating the possibility of young, explosive volcanism in this region.

The Taurus-Littrow study area, centered on the Apollo 17 landing site at °N latitude, °E longitude, is a valley on the edge of Mare Serenitatis that astronauts Gene Cernan and Jack Schmitt explored in December LROC has imaged the Apollo 16 and Apollo 17 sites several times under different lighting conditions.

The Apollo 17 astronauts landed in Taurus-Littrow. Taurus-Littrow ° N latitude, ° E longitude. The landing site for the final Apollo lunar landing mission, Taurus-Littrow, takes its name from the Taurus mountains and Littrow crater which are located in a mountainous region on the southeastern rim of the Serenitatis basin.

Apollo 17 astronaut Harrison Schmitt on the Moon, Apollo 17 geologist-astronaut Harrison Schmitt at the foot of a huge split boulder, Decemduring the mission's third extravehicular exploration of the Taurus-Littrow Valley landing site on the Moon.

This is the landing site of the last Apollo mission (Apollo 17). It was in the valley among the Taurus-Littrow hills on the southeastern rim of Mare Serenitatis.

Astronauts Eugene Cernan and Harrison H. Schmitt explored the valley with the aid of an electrically powered car. Apollo 17 landed in the Taurus-Littrow Valley on the eastern edge of Mare Serenitatis. There were two main geology objectives for this site: to obtain samples of ancient rocks from the lunar highlands and to look for evidence of young volcanic activity on the valley floor.

The Taurus-Littrow Valley, Apollo 17 Landing Site ASP 4 years 8 months ago # For those unfamiliar with the many anomalous aspects of the Apollo 17 surface mission, I think Keith Laney's "A Hidden Mission for Apollo 17" article is the first and most comprehensive version I have read.

She taught Apollo Astronauts about the Moon. She and Harrison "Jack" Schmitt, the Apollo 17 geologist-astronaut, wrote a paper on lunar orange glass being volcanic rather than impact derived.

She proved that the landslide at the Apollo 17 site was dislodged by ejecta from the young crater Tycho. Taurus-Littrow: Height map of the area around the Apollo 17 landing site (60x60 km).

Exaggerated 30 times in the Z axis for better visualization. The small arrow indicates the Apollo 17 landing site in the Taurus-Littrow Valley in this oblique view from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera–Narrow Angle Camera. Click for high-resolution version and more information from the LROC team.

Apollo Program: Seven NASA Publications on the Apollo 17 Mission. A varied assortment of NASA related - Available at April 18 Space Exploration. The Apollo 17 landing site was unique in several respects: (1) It was the only site that was not selected from telescopic-based geologic interpretation; interest in the site was generated by the visual obser-vations of A1 Wordcn, Apollo 15 Command Module pilot, who interpreted dark-haloed craters as possible cinder cones.

(2) Instead. Detailed geologic map, Apollo 17 (Taurus-Littrow) landing area, October Open-File Report By: E.W. Wolfe and V.L. Freeman. This volume contains papers that have been accepted for presentation at the Workshop on Geology of the Apollo 17 Landing Site, December, in Houston, Texas.

The Program Committee consisted of G. Ryder (Lunar and Planetary Institute), H. Schmitt (Consultant, Apollo 17 Lunar Module Pilot), and P. Spudis (Lunar and Planetary Institute). “The Geologic Investigation of the Taurus-Littrow Valley: Apollo 17 Landing Site.” USGS Professional Paper $75 Published inthis is one of only a few rare publications the USGS did on behalf of NASA in connection with the Apollo program.

Mr Bryant, who also runs a business selling meteorite parts, has compared NASA images of a mountain near Taurus Littrow, said to have been taken on .Apollo 17 astronauts explored the Taurus–Littrow valley on the Moon, December 11–14, (Schmitt, ).NASA's operational and scientific advisors recommended landing in the valley largely because its rugged and multifaceted topography and apparently complex geological history provided fitting diversity for this last Apollo mission to the Moon ().Cited by: